Monday, September 15, 2014

Homework Assignment 1: Tonal Drawing Self-Portrait Assignment with hand or foot DUE Oct 6

Homework Assignment 1: Tonal Drawing Self-Portrait Assignment with hand or foot    

Due: Monday Oct 6

Assignment Summary:
Using a mirror and observational drawing skills students will depict themselves in a self-portrait tonal drawing which will also incorporate their foot or hand.

Size: 18 x 24 inches on white cartridge paper

Materials: Tonal Drawing on white cartridge paper (18 x 24 inches) using a choice of black charcoal pencils, and/or black & white conte sticks

Subject Matter Details/Requirements:
Portrait parameters are defined as depicting yourself from the collarbone to entire head.
The face should take up a minimum of 50% of the drawing page and the hand or foot should take up a minimum 25% of the drawing page. At least 75% of the face should be unobstructed (in clear view). Potential obstructions of the face could include costume accessory, hand, etc.

The frame of the mirror should be included if it is in your field of vision when composing the requirements with in this assignment.

Lighting:
In order to keep the lighting consistent when developing the tonal aspects of the drawing it is strongly suggested that some sort of artificial lighting close in proximity to the face is used to create effective range of dark and light tones (effective highlights and shadows)

Process:
This assignment requires a process of observational drawing. Be prepared for a layering, editing and revising during the drawing process.



Objectives and Evaluation Criteria for Assignment (Repeat of Ideas presented during first class):

1) Process from Beginning to Completion of Drawing   -    Progression of Layers from Rough and Tentative Drawing  Material Applications to Strategic use and Layering of: Detail, Contrast and Rendering Control): 
Tonal drawing involves layering process that starts tentatively (drawn lightly and rough with soft edges) With this type of drawing in early stages initially map out subject matter into basic shapes of light and shadow (planes & other basic shapes) No detail should be in the beginning stages of drawing and start in the center work directly out and around from initial shape. Use initial shape as building block and reference for comparing proportion and choosing composition. 

Tentatively (and lightly) map out entire composition before committing to: detail, exact locations of shapes, levels of high contrast, thick layering of drawing mediums, and sharp edges. Anticipate editing with a combination of additive and subtractive processes in the drawing. As in previous tonal work anticipate at times a messy process of restating and editing to occur during the layering process. Remember for a rendered drawing the ultimate goal is to absorb all lines into shaded areas.

2) Range of Tones, Edges and Mark Making: 
Anticipate strategically using a full range of grayscales (dark to light tones) and range of edges (hard/sharp to soft/out of focus edges) during the entire drawing process. During the early stages of the drawing use only soft (tentative/out of focus) edges and light to middle grayscale tones to tentatively map out entire drawing. As well utilize a full range of mark making from smudged to raw marks, short to long marks, curved to angular marks, and various pressures of gentle touch to pressing heavily on the drawing surface. When investigating mark making, tones and edges keep in mind that your eraser can be a drawing tool as much as any other drawing medium. 

3) Accurate Proportion, Scale and Potential Perspective Concepts: 
Utilizing measurements, horizontal/vertical alignments and potentially even some 1pt & 2pt perspective concepts for background. When working from observation generally use the theories of perspective (vanishing points & horizon line) at later stages of drawing as a tool for checking accuracy of proportions, scale, etc. In any  assignments whether working from observation or imagination generally you should not lock into horizon line and vanishing points until proportions are resolved in background. 

4) Composition: Locate an interesting viewpoint with a reasonable level of difficulty that will have a unique and complex interaction of shapes through out picture (including border of drawing) and choose a composition that is conducive for presenting the subject matter requirements (listed above) for assignment. 

5) Strategic Levels of Contrast: 
Increasing or decreasing contrast in strategically chosen areas will assist in depicting the illusion of 3 dimensional forms and the illusion of the portrait, had or foot and space. Often a subtle progression of decreased contrast (along with hard to soft edges) from foreground to background will need consideration in the final stages of the layering process to convey a convincing illusion of 3 dimensional forms and space.

6) Forms/Volumes & Space: 
Clear depiction in the illusion of 3 dimensional masses in space that progresses in a clear manner from foreground to background. Over lapping of forms and strategic use of detail, contrast, range of edges, grayscales, angles and composition will all be crucial in achieving a strong illusion of 3 dimensional mass and depth of space.

7) Strategic Use of Detail: 
Anticipate that progressively there will be less detail as the viewer moves back into the space of the picture plane. Various levels of detail will also be required on some forms or planes located in the foreground (such as the face/head and or hand) and at times in the middle ground depending on the spatial location of the subject matter. This is the final stage of the layering process. Make time to allow for some careful finishing touches and to strategically refine or layer over select rougher areas in the work. In some ways this has connections to the ranges of marking in the drawing and layering process.

Images and Additional Information for Assignment 1 - Examples of Tonal Self Portraits without hands and feet

The following examples of Tonal Self Portraits are missing some of the assignment requirements and objectives (such as there are no depictions of  hands and feet) As well some are better in addressing  assignment objectives than others. Review list of assignment objectives below and for further explanation on assignment objectives and requirements see assignment 1 information

Assignment Objectives:
1) Drawing Process and Layering from Beginning to Completion of Drawing   

2) Range of Tones, Edges and Mark Making: 

3) Accurate Proportion, Scale and Potential Perspective Concepts: 

4) Composition: 

5) Strategic Levels of Contrast: 

6) Forms/Volumes & Space: 

7) Strategic Use of Detail: 




Self-Portrait Drawing Example in 3 Stages:

Stage 1 of Drawing with tentative layers and description of subject matter




Stage 2 of Drawing with further layers and increased use of contrast and detail in subject matter





Stage 3 Completion of Drawing Presenting multiple revisions/layers along with strategic use and progression of contrast, detail and sharp to soft edges in subject matter progressing from Foreground to background.




Detail of Stage 3 Completion of Drawing








Self-Portrait Drawing Example in 2 Stages:

Stage 1





Stage 2







Other Examples of Tonal Portraiture and Self- Portaits








Detail of Previous Image



Advanced Drawing 1 Fall 2007


Advanced Drawing 1 Fall 2007




Advanced Drawing 1 Fall 2005


Advanced Drawing 1 Fall 2005


Advanced Drawing 1 Fall 2005






Line Drawing Objectives

Process: As in most drawings for this figure study course Line Drawing is a layering process that starts tentatively (drawn lightly and rough with fluid line) A line drawing in early stages initially maps out subject matter (and ideas) in basic shapes (planes & other basic geometric shapes) No detail in beginning stages of drawing. For the sake of proportions if possible it is most ideal to start the drawing in the center and usually from the torso area, working directly out and around from an initial shape (that is usually rectangular or square in shape such as the torso). Use initial shape (usually the torso) as a building block and as a reference for comparing proportion and choosing composition. For longer studies and poses tentatively (lightly) map out entire composition before committing to detail or exact locations of shapes. Overall anticipate at times a messy process of restating and editing to occur during the layering process.

Line Quality and Characteristics: Fluidness and strategic use of line weight variation will bring depth of space, sense of 3 dimensional masses, character and life into the drawing. Repetition and taking the time to practice and figure out a way to enjoy the act of drawing will always improve line characteristics or qualities in any drawing process. In the early stages of the line drawing keep the line thin and light. As the drawing develops towards the later stages anticipate variations of line characteristics to include ranges from curved to angular, quick to careful line applications on the drawing surface and in some areas progressions from thin to thick lines and light to dark lines. (Let the line flow!)

Accurate Proportion, Scale and Perspective: Utilize measurements, horizontal/vertical alignments and potential 1pt & 2pt perspective concepts. When working from observation generally use the theories of perspective (vanishing points & horizon line) at later stages of drawing as an auxiliary tool for checking accuracy of proportions, scale, etc. Whether working from observation or imagination do not lock into horizon line and vanishing points until proportions are resolved.

Composition: Locate an interesting view with a reasonable level of difficulty that is unique and has complex interactions of shapes through out picture (including border of drawing) and choose a composition that is conducive for presenting the objectives for the assignment. In terms of composition also consider how the white space of the page works around the figure and within the negative spaces created by the figure.

Mass/Volumes & Space: Clear depiction in the illusion of 3 dimensional forms in space that progresses in a clear manner from foreground to background. Over lapping of forms and strategic use of detail, line variation, angles and composition will all be crucial in achieving a strong illusion of 3 dimensional mass and depth of space.

Strategic Use of Detail: Anticipate that progressively there will be less detail as the viewer moves back into space of the picture plane. Some forms on the model/figure and any objects or planes surrounding the figure may require various levels of detail in foreground and at times in the middleground. This is the final stage of the layering process. Make time to allow for some careful finishing touches and to strategically refine or layer over rougher areas in the work.

Monday, September 8, 2014

B & W Interior/Exterior Assignment with Hands and or Feet

oil pastel          24 x 18 inches
Drawing Studio 1 course


 acrylic and ink       18 x 24 inches
Drawing Studio 1 course


black and white conte      24 x 18 inches
Drawing Studio 1 course

Foreshortened Figure



Monday, September 1, 2014

Course Syllabus & Outline - Figure Study 1

University of Manitoba, School of Art     
Figure Study 1   STDO 1240  A01 

Instructor:                     Derek Brueckner                           

Class location:                  Art Lab 466
Class time:                     Monday  2:30pm to  5:20pm

Outofclass work:             Up to 6 hours per week (2x contact hours)

Office:                            Art Lab 337 or 332A        204 474-9549       (no voicemail)
Office hours:                   Generally before class or by appointment. If possible book an appointment via email prior to meeting.

Email:                            Derek.Brueckner@umanitoba.ca

Online materials:           Copies of the syllabus, materials list and any additional course documents, will be made available online as PDFs for students to download at any time at the courses page on Desire2Learn https://umanitoba.desire2learn.com/d2l/login. 

Course Website:           Additional student work examples, all assignment descriptionand additional course information will also be available on: http://derekbruecknerfigurestudycourse.blogspot.com

Posting of Grades:       Grades for all Art assignments will be posted on Desire2Learn: https://universityofmanitoba.desire2learn.com

Course description:     Traditional and experimental drawing approaches to rendering the figure, culminating

                                       in the production of  a portfolio of drawings. Prerequisite for further study in fine arts
                                       studio courses. May not be held with STDO 1200 (054.120). 0.0  to 1.5 Credit Hours.


This course introduces traditional and experimental drawing approaches to the acquisition of key competencies within a figurative tradition of rendering. Emphasis is placed on the development of observational skills through regular practice. A portfolio of completed drawings is produced.

Topics to be covered in the course include:

·       Drawing from the model during regular scheduled sessions 
·       Proportion and basic anatomical structure as observed through lifedrawing exercises
·       Portraiture
·       The use of various drawing materials (wet and dry), collage, experimental drawing techniques (please note that the use of solventbased materials, compressed charcoal and sprays are not allowed in the drawing studios)

Objectives:                    By the end of the course, students will have: 

·       Demonstrated knowledge of and growing proficiency with the techniques and concerns
introduced in the course, as evidenced in final portfolios of inclass exercises.
·       Produced two standalone works, in the form of a directed Takehome Assignments, which shows a facility with and synthesis of material presented and skills acquired in the course.
·       Concisely articulated, both in writing and in the context of group critique, their personal objectives in producing works and the measures taken to achieve those aims.
·       Consistently provided constructive feedback to their peers during all group critiques.

E-mail Communications
University communications will only be sent to a student’s U of M account. The full policy is available at umanitoba.ca/governance. All students are required to claim their U of M “myumanitoba.ca” student email account. This is a campus-wide policy. Learn how to activate your email at: umanitoba.ca/studentemail.       

It is mandatory that all students maintain and regularly monitor a University of Manitoba email account. Critical information from the registrar, instructors, and the School of Art will be relayed to you through the Web mail, D2L and Aurora electronic notification systems.

Students without personal computers can use computers in Information Services and Technology labs in a variety of locations on campus including the Dafoe Library or Art Lab if you are enrolled in fine arts studio courses. More information is available in your orientation package or by calling IST at 474-8600. It is your sole responsibility to continually monitor your class site(s) for information such as class announcements and email correspondence.

E-mails received from non-U of M accounts will be directed to resend their inquiry from their U of M email account for a response. Returning students sending emails from personal accounts will not receive a response.


Activities (subject to change)

Class 1     Mon    Sept 8:  Introduction (no model)
·        Introduction to the syllabus and Presentation of Assignment 1.
·        Setup: Getting to know the studio furniture, drawing posture, etc.
·        Gestures: blind gesture drawings (2 @ 5 minutes)
·        Medium: Partner drawing (1 @ 20 minutes)
·        Longer: Public space drawing with people(1 @ 30 minutes)
·        Regular studio materials

Class 2    Mon    Sept 15: Gesture  and contour 1 (Model)

·       Gestures: (10 @ 1 minute)
·       Short: Gesture+ drawings (5 @ 5 minutes)
·       Short: Active/offbalance poses (5 @ 5 minutes)
·       Medium: (3 @ 15 minutes)
·       Longer: reclining/foreshortened poses (2 @ 30 minutes)
·        Regular studio materials + pencils (see supply list) and 3 coloured pencils

Class 3   Mon    Sept 22: Gesture  and contour 2 (Model)

·       Gestures: (10 @ 1 minute)
·       Short: Gesture+ drawings (5 @ 5 minutes)
·       Short: Active/offbalance poses (5 @ 5 minutes)
·       Medium: (3 @ 15 minutes)
·       Longer: reclining/foreshortened poses (2 @ 30 minutes)
·        Regular studio materials + pencils (see supply list) and 3 coloured pencils

Class 4  Mon    Sept 29: Tonal drawing 1 (Model)

·       Gestures: (5 @ 1 minute)
·       Short: Tonal studies (4 @ 7 minutes)
·       Longer: Toned ground (2 @ 30 minutes)
·       Longer: Tonal (2 @ 30 minutes)
·        Regular studio materials + pencils (see supply list) and graphite sticks
·        Sturdy paper/drawinsurfaces (recommended)
·        Portfolio Submission Classes 1 to 4    20% of course grade

Class Mon    Oct 6:    Tonal drawing 2 (Model)

·       Gestures: (5 @ 1 minute)
·       Short: Tonal studies (4 @ 7 minutes)
·       Longer: Toned ground (2 @ 30 minutes)
·       Longer: Tonal (2 @ 30 minutes)
·        Regular studio material+ pencils, graphite sticks, and charcoal pencils
·        Sturdy paper/drawinsurfaces (recommended)
·        Assignment 1 due  Self-Portraits with hands or feet - Tonal Drawing Assignment     15% of course grade

Class Mon    Oct 20:   People in real space   - Combination of Line Drawing and Tonal Drawing (no model)
·        Presentation of Assignment 2.
·        Students will set up in areas of campus with steady foot traffic, working in a selfdirected manner to draw subjects in unstaged scenarios.
·        Short: Brief studies of individuals and small groups (several)
·        Longer: A sustained drawing (1 hour minimum) showing the movement of people over time.
·        Regular studio materials + graphite sticks and charcoal pencils


Class Mon    Oct 27:   Contour and movement (Model)

·      Gestures: (15 @ 1 minute)
·      Short: Gesture sequences (5 @ 6 minutes)
·      Longer: Sustained sequences (3 @ 40 minutes)
·        Regular studio materials + graphite sticks, charcoal pencils and B& W wet media
·        Sturdy paper/drawinsurface (strongly recommended)

Class Mon    Nov 3:   Interacting figures 1 (Model)

·      Gestures (10 @ 2 minutes)
·      Medium: (3 @ 20 minutes)
·      Sustained: (1 @ 80 minutes)
·        Regular studio materials + graphite sticks, charcoal pencils and B& W wet media
·        Sturdy paper/drawinsurface (recommended)

Class Mon    Nov 10: Interacting figures and Figure in Perspective (Two  Models)

·      Gestures (10 @ 2 minutes)
·      Medium: (3 @ 20 minutes)
·      Sustained: (1 @ 80 minutes)
·        Regular studio materials + combined B& W media of choice
·        Sturdy paper/drawing  surface (recommended)

 Class 10  Mon    Nov 17:          Sustained tonal drawing 1 (Model)

·      Sustained: (1 x 150 minutes) Regular  studio  materials + combined B& W media of choice
·        Sturdy paper/drawinsurface (strongly recommended)

 Class 11  Mon    Nov 24:          Sustained tonal drawing of Figure with Projection (Model)

·      Sustained: (1 x 150 minutes) Regular  studio  materials + combined B& W media of choice
·        Sturdy paper/drawinsurface (strongly recommended)
·        Portfolio Submission Classes 5 to 11    45% of course grade

 Class 12  Mon    Dec 1:

·        Assignment 2 due Thematic Figure Drawing Assignment 15% of course grade
·        Fullgroup critique of Assignment 2



Course materials



Regular Studio Materials:
Please bring to all class  meetings


Optional materials:






 Drawing board
Plywood, Masonite, or fiberboard large enough to accommodate 18 × 24 paper/pad.

 Bulldog/binder clips

18 x 24 newsprint  pad(s)
For gesture drawings and short drawings

18 x 24 cartridge  paper pad / white drawing paper
For medium, longer, and sustained drawings

Kneaded eraser

 Gum or plastic eraser

 Push pins



Occasional studio materials:
Please bring on days indicated in the course schedule.

Studier paper or other drawing surfaces
Strongly  recommended for longer and sustained drawing exercises. Can be white or toned. Brands carried at the campus Bookstore include Maidstone, Stonehenge, Arches, Rives, and Somerset. Fabriano Accademia  is quite cheap and comes in
19x25 sheets that should fit on a standard drawing board. They also carry illustration board in various sizes.

Youre welcome  to use other papers (translucent vellums, Japanese papers, paper mounted on panel, etc.) or alternative surfaces (found  materials, panel, fabric, collage etc.). If you have any questions about drawing surfaces and suitable materials, dont hesitate to ask.

 Cardboard portfolio large enough to accommodate your portfolio submisions(recommended)


 Sketchbook or small drawing pad
For preliminary drawings/sketches. Will not be collected for marking.

 Charcoal/conté pencils, chalk pastels, conté crayons Be sure to have white on hand if you plan to use toned or coloured paper. Please be advised that compressed charcoal may not be used in the drawing classroom.

 Ink drawing supplies
Watercolour paper (pad or tablet), black acrylic or India ink, brushes, containers for water

 Markers

 Drawing pencils
H, 2B, 4B and 6B recommended

 Graphite sticks

Pencil sharpener or utility knife

Black & White Oil pastels (For use at home only)

Workable  fixative (For use at home only)
Drawings made with dry media (charcoal, pencil, pastel, etc.)
should be fixed as soon after completion as possible to avoid
smudging, and all drawings must be fixed before being
submitted as part of your final portfolio to avoid damage
during the marking process. However, use of aerosols is
strictly forbidden in the drawing classroom itself and in
the vicinity of Art Lab.


Material and process  restrictions:

Flammables, poisons, potentially biohazardous materials, aerosol sprays, compressed charcoal, powder pigments and high-­‐ temperature processes are strictly prohibited in the Foundations classrooms, adjoining hallways and the vicinity of the Fitzgerald Building. The instructor must be consulted before any materials
or processes not on the class materials list may be used. If there is any doubt as to the safety of work to be undertaken, work must

be halted until the instructor has been consulted. Students must receive instruction and approval from a technician or instructor before using any tools, machines or special processes.